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Microsoft this week won a years-old patent infringement case involving technology it used to speed the boot time of Windows XP. Acceleration Software International Corp sued Microsoft for infringing on its 1999 patent in XP, and a loss could have cost the software giant up to $900 million. However, an east Texas jury found that Microsoft did not infringe on the patent. In fact, it also found that the patent was invalid because "it was obvious" (yes, seriously) and was pre-existing technology at the time of the patent grant in 1999.
by: zoobabzoobab
19 Nov 2007 15:50
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Page 3 is the best part of the interview. Mr. Hilf talks about having a "map" (which wasn’t correct, as Information Week pointed out); he then adds: "Classically, our preferred plan is to license our technology in a very proactive and productive way versus litigate." Which doesn’t answer the questions: what, are, these, patents? Mr. Hilf, please tell us. We all want to know. Please.
by: zoobabzoobab
19 Nov 2007 15:49
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These are almost old news, but it seems that since we’re based in Europe it took some time and went through different channels. Ars Aperta has joined the OpenInvention Network. The question that would immediately pop to some of my readers’ mind would be: what the heck is OpenInvention Network? And then I assume there would be questions about the official position of Ars Aperta in regard of software patents. Let me seize this opportunity to address this quite interesting question. First, the OIN is in the business of acquiring software patents and granting rights on them for free to anyone. Its founders are IBM, Red Hat, Philips, NEC, Sony and Novell.
by: zoobabzoobab
19 Nov 2007 00:37
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The key to that is to separate, people's, individuals' and groups' belief about software patents as an issue and then what is the current way that we do patent law in at least the United States. You may disagree with it, but there's a law for how we deal with patents. They often get wrapped up together as the same issue, but they're not the same. As a company, we're hyperactively involved with patent reform and trying to find models that work best for the industry. But it is key, as you have these conversations, particularly with the open source community, keep in the back of your mind, what is the current model for doing business, right, wrong or indifferent, and then what is the opinion about software patents as an issue.
by: zoobabzoobab
19 Nov 2007 00:25
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Finally, IP Innovation and Technology Licensing Corp. -- in other words, ACACIA -- filed a lawsuit in Marshall against Google, accusing Google's search engine and Google Earth of infringing two patents. This is the same Acacia sub that sued Red Hat and Novell over Linux, with the same lawyers - Johnny Ward and Eric Albritton. But these are different patents. The patents asserted against Google are 5,276,785 and 5,675,819, which Acacia got from Xerox.
by: zoobabzoobab
18 Nov 2007 15:11
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Watch the following 3-minute video. All in all, Yahoo’s talk about patent trolls was interesting. By no means, however, think of Yahoo as a pleasant company.
by: zoobabzoobab
18 Nov 2007 12:17
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Several senators proposed legislation on Thursday to ban tax-planning patents, as concerns mount at the Internal Revenue Service that such patents may be used to illegally avoid taxes. The bill, introduced by Sens. Max Baucus (D-Mont.) and Chuck Grassley (R-Iowa), would prohibit patents on all tax strategies. A similar bill was proposed in May in the House, and was attached to a major patent law overhaul bill during the summer. That overhaul bill is now before the Senate, where it is expected this new amendment will be added.
by: zoobabzoobab
17 Nov 2007 23:11
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Until recently InRotis, a small company spun out of Newcastle University, was part of a High Court action aimed at forcing the UK Intellectual Property Office to ensure the patent protection offered to UK patent holders matches that available in Europe. However, the firm was granted a European patent for its work, and as a result has dropped out of the action. Lawyers acting for the remaining four firms involved in the case say InRotis' departure proves the very point their clients are trying to make.
by: zoobabzoobab
17 Nov 2007 22:39
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Microsoft won a patent dispute this week over technology that helps computers boot up faster. The suit, filed in the U.S. District Court for the Eastern District of Texas, charged Microsoft with infringing on U.S. patent 5933630, which was issued in 1999 to Acceleration Software International Corp. The suit asked the court to award the patent holder $2.50 per copy of Windows XP sold in the U.S. By Microsoft's account, that could have amounted to between $600 million and $900 million.
by: zoobabzoobab
16 Nov 2007 09:19
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SISVEL announced today that it is acting as the facilitator for the creation of a joint CDMA2000 patent license and is issuing a call for patents and other enforceable patent rights that are essential to the CDMA2000 standard. Sisvel has discussed with parties holding essential CDMA2000 patents to advance the process of structuring a joint license to make essential CDMA2000 patents easily accessible to all users on fair, reasonable, and non-discriminatory terms. Several meetings will be held in the coming months to reach consensus on licensing terms with the objective of reaching an agreement by the beginning of 2008, and upon successful evaluation, all parties holding essential patents will be invited to join the process.
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 16:46
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Fort Myers-based NeoMedia Technologies Inc. announced Wednesday that the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office is re-examining one of its patents. NeoMedia has developed bar code reading technology that links camera phone users directly to the Web. The company has a large portfolio of U.S. and foreign patents and pending applications for inventions that involve the processing of "machine readable codes over wireless networks."
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 13:57
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The recent introduction of a favourable tax exemption for patents should provide a significant fillip for companies involved in research and development in Belgium. Research and development is the big winner from the introduction of a favorable tax regime for patent income in Belgium.This regime should, together with the notional interest deduction, further attract foreign investors to Belgium and be welcomed by existing Belgian companies and branches. The new tax incentive for patents comes down to an 80 percent tax exemption of patent income as a result of which the nominal tax rate for such income.
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 13:52
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Mark Chandler, Cisco: "As an innovator and large patent holder - our portfolio was recently rated No. 1 in the telecommunications world by the Patent Board - we certainly support strong laws that protect inventors' creativity and innovations and the companies and people who may ultimately own those inventions. Yet, we face a growing tide of patent litigation and an environment that is deterring innovation by siphoning resources that could be spend on research and development."
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 13:49
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Vonage settlement of three software patents suits has critics up in arms again. But calls to restrict software patents as anticompetitive remain pointless and futile. Why is it that software patents get no respect? After almost every high-profile lawsuit involving software patents, there are cries of dismay and derision over how the intellectual property system is being abused to con juries and extract corporate ransom.
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 13:37
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Garmin Ltd. announces today a confidential global settlement of all of its intellectual property litigation with TomTom. The settlement resolves all of the pending intellectual property litigation including cases in the UK, Netherlands, Wisconsin, and Texas. The parties did not disclose details of their agreement.
by: zoobabzoobab
15 Nov 2007 13:35
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Delaware firm Autotext Technologies has filed a patent infringement lawsuit against 23 major technology companies including Apple and IBM, regarding predictive word processing. [...] All companies listed in the lawsuit, Autotext alleges, are infringing on a "computer-based transcription" patent that was filed in 1994. The patent is loosely about predictive word processing, where a list of words is presented when a user begins to input letters, hence the Autotext nomenclature.
by: zoobabzoobab
14 Nov 2007 20:27
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Technology Patents LLC may be the new champion for suing 131 companies worldwide—the list goes on and on, naming companies like Vodafone, Orange, T-Mobile, Telstra, AT&T, Cincinnati Bell, Motorola, Microsoft, Helio, Taiwan Mobile, O2, Rogers Wireless, China Resources Peoples Telephone Company, Yahoo, Sprint, and everyone in between. The company and its founder, Aris Mardirossian, are suing over what he believes to be infringement on two of his patents that address international text messaging.
by: zoobabzoobab
14 Nov 2007 15:44
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The patent-holding firm could "send letters to big companies saying, 'We have 800 patents that cover your business,'" said Ron Laurie, managing director of Inflexion Point Strategy LLC, a Palo Alto, Calif., investment bank specializing in intellectual property. That is a "game changer," he said, because companies usually get warned over just a few patents. Faced with such massive numbers, he said, "nobody can risk going to court, and they're just going to write you a check."
by: zoobabzoobab
14 Nov 2007 13:45
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Agreement will cover intellectual property contained in hardware and software products, including certain Linux-based technologies. Microsoft Corp. and Kyocera Mita Corp. have signed a patent cross-licensing agreement to allow access to each company’s respective patent portfolio. The agreement encompasses a broad range of patents and will help further each company’s research and development (R&D) efforts.
by: zoobabzoobab
14 Nov 2007 13:33
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Through this agreement, Kyocera Mita will gain access to Microsoft's patents for Kyocera Mit's current and future product lines, including multifunction products (MFP), printers, copiers and certain Linux-based embedded devices. Microsoft will gain access to Kyocera Mita patents for Microsoft's current and future product lines, including Microsoft Windows, Microsoft Office and other IT product lines.
by: zoobabzoobab
14 Nov 2007 13:30
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